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Normally at the end of each month I compile a list of cruelty-free updates and blog posts I loved. Today's post still features those things, but with a twist. Enjoy.

Over the past few months I've been careful to curate my social media feeds so that I see content that interests me and inspires me  blog posts, news articles and tweets that I can laugh at and/or learn from. 

Naturally a large percentage of this includes the cruelty-free community... so I always do a bit of a double take when someone doesn't share the same views about animal testing, even though I know plenty of people still use MAC and the like, and our group, although growing, is in the minority.

(Speaking of, why are MAC, L'Oreal and other non-cf companies always popping up on my Instagram ads? I'm not interested!)


Skin & Tonic products

If you have an interest in cruelty-free beauty then chances are you will have seen the outrage caused earlier in the month when a beauty blogger wrote a post about why they will never go cruelty-free. Their argument basically boiled down to 'I do not agree with animal testing but I love these non-cf products too much to stop buying them'. It was implied that if you can't be completely ethical  vegan diet, no fast fashion, not buying from tax-dodging companies etc  then what's the point in trying? This kind of thinking is defeatist. No one can be the perfect consumer, but it's better to do something than it is to do nothing, and what that something is is down to the individual.

Animal testing for medical purposes was also mentioned, but medicine and make-up are two entirely different things. One of those things saves lives. One of those things, while bringing joy to many of us, is a luxury item.

Here are my favourite responses.

Stop Making Excuses
(written by Sarah from The V Nice Life)

Key Quote: 'To be completely honest, I would much rather someone say that they're just not that into animals than someone who pretends to be an animal lover and who makes bold claims that they're against animal testing, but who will still buy non-cruelty-free products. If those statements were true then you would simply stop buying from the brands who test on animals, no matter how amazing the make-up is. I'm so tired of reading these excuses and I'm annoyed that people just can't be honest with themselves and their readers/viewers.'

You Don't Have to Be Perfect to Be Cruelty-Free
(written by Steph from The Zombie Said)

Key Quote: 'The point isn't and has never been perfection; it's reduction. Either we can be causing as much devastation as absolutely everyday else, or we can try to drop it down a few pegs and do what we can to make a difference. If we can all take small steps, within our means, to reduce animal suffering and the demand for animal testing in cosmetics, then we can begin to send a message to big businesses that they need to change.'

And here are some blog posts about going cruelty-free and feeling overwhelmed. They're not from this month but I felt it was important to include them anyway, just in case you needed some reassuring words.

How to Go Cruelty-Free
(written by Alex from Alex Grace Jones)

Key Quote: 'I would love to have the luxury of being able to go to my make-up box, chuck out everything that I know comes from a brand that tests, and then fully restock with all-new cruelty-free products, but my bank account unfortunately won't allow it. But that doesn't mean I am in any way okay with animal testing, I am just going about my clear-out in a different way... I sat down with all my make-up, skincare, and hair care and marked everything that was tested on animals. With these, I marked them up with a sticker and decided to use them until they were finished, and then obviously not repurchase them or talk about them on my blog... I don't want to advertise companies that agree with testing animals, no matter how good they are.'

On Ethical Living, and Feeling Overwhelmed
(written by Nadia from Not So Quiet Grrl)

Key Quote: 'Ultimately, as participants in capitalist society, it is going to be hard for us to lead fully ethical lives. All we can do is try our best within our means, learning as much as we can along the way, and adapting when we can without restricting ourselves. We're doing the best that we can, and that's great.'

Beautifully put. As I will say time and time again, there is no such thing as the perfect consumer. Taking whatever steps suit you at whatever pace suits you (Alex's sticker idea is genius) is more than good enough  all you can do is your best.

How do you feel about going cruelty-free? Let me know in the comments!

Cruelty Free Updates: The Perfect Consumer is a Myth

Normally at the end of each month I compile a list of cruelty-free updates and blog posts I loved. Today's post still features those things, but with a twist. Enjoy.

Over the past few months I've been careful to curate my social media feeds so that I see content that interests me and inspires me  blog posts, news articles and tweets that I can laugh at and/or learn from. 

Naturally a large percentage of this includes the cruelty-free community... so I always do a bit of a double take when someone doesn't share the same views about animal testing, even though I know plenty of people still use MAC and the like, and our group, although growing, is in the minority.

(Speaking of, why are MAC, L'Oreal and other non-cf companies always popping up on my Instagram ads? I'm not interested!)


Skin & Tonic products

If you have an interest in cruelty-free beauty then chances are you will have seen the outrage caused earlier in the month when a beauty blogger wrote a post about why they will never go cruelty-free. Their argument basically boiled down to 'I do not agree with animal testing but I love these non-cf products too much to stop buying them'. It was implied that if you can't be completely ethical  vegan diet, no fast fashion, not buying from tax-dodging companies etc  then what's the point in trying? This kind of thinking is defeatist. No one can be the perfect consumer, but it's better to do something than it is to do nothing, and what that something is is down to the individual.

Animal testing for medical purposes was also mentioned, but medicine and make-up are two entirely different things. One of those things saves lives. One of those things, while bringing joy to many of us, is a luxury item.

Here are my favourite responses.

Stop Making Excuses
(written by Sarah from The V Nice Life)

Key Quote: 'To be completely honest, I would much rather someone say that they're just not that into animals than someone who pretends to be an animal lover and who makes bold claims that they're against animal testing, but who will still buy non-cruelty-free products. If those statements were true then you would simply stop buying from the brands who test on animals, no matter how amazing the make-up is. I'm so tired of reading these excuses and I'm annoyed that people just can't be honest with themselves and their readers/viewers.'

You Don't Have to Be Perfect to Be Cruelty-Free
(written by Steph from The Zombie Said)

Key Quote: 'The point isn't and has never been perfection; it's reduction. Either we can be causing as much devastation as absolutely everyday else, or we can try to drop it down a few pegs and do what we can to make a difference. If we can all take small steps, within our means, to reduce animal suffering and the demand for animal testing in cosmetics, then we can begin to send a message to big businesses that they need to change.'

And here are some blog posts about going cruelty-free and feeling overwhelmed. They're not from this month but I felt it was important to include them anyway, just in case you needed some reassuring words.

How to Go Cruelty-Free
(written by Alex from Alex Grace Jones)

Key Quote: 'I would love to have the luxury of being able to go to my make-up box, chuck out everything that I know comes from a brand that tests, and then fully restock with all-new cruelty-free products, but my bank account unfortunately won't allow it. But that doesn't mean I am in any way okay with animal testing, I am just going about my clear-out in a different way... I sat down with all my make-up, skincare, and hair care and marked everything that was tested on animals. With these, I marked them up with a sticker and decided to use them until they were finished, and then obviously not repurchase them or talk about them on my blog... I don't want to advertise companies that agree with testing animals, no matter how good they are.'

On Ethical Living, and Feeling Overwhelmed
(written by Nadia from Not So Quiet Grrl)

Key Quote: 'Ultimately, as participants in capitalist society, it is going to be hard for us to lead fully ethical lives. All we can do is try our best within our means, learning as much as we can along the way, and adapting when we can without restricting ourselves. We're doing the best that we can, and that's great.'

Beautifully put. As I will say time and time again, there is no such thing as the perfect consumer. Taking whatever steps suit you at whatever pace suits you (Alex's sticker idea is genius) is more than good enough  all you can do is your best.

How do you feel about going cruelty-free? Let me know in the comments!
I love wearing eyeliner, but I also get sore, itchy eyes during the summer months.

(And sometimes during spring, too. Hay fever is not kind.)

This always puts me right off wearing make-up. However, there are days when I quite fancy wearing something a little more dressy, make-up included, and it seems a shame to avoid it solely because of an allergy.

So when I spotted NATOrigin's Original Pencil Eyeliners* on LoveLula it seemed like the perfect time to try them out. The entire range is hypoallergenic and made especially for sensitive skin and eyes.

NATOrigin's products are:

  • Cruelty-free
  • Approved by the Vegetarian Society
  • Approved by Allergy UK
  • Certified natural and organic
  • Free from synthetic colours, fragrances, and preservatives
  • Housed in recyclable packaging


Exactly the kind of thing I look for! I decided to try the Original Pencil Eyeliner in Grey and Brown.

NATOrigin Original Pencil Eyeliners

Sensitive Eyes

As both a hay fever sufferer and a contact lens wearer, I know a fair bit about having sore eyes (damn you, grass pollen). Luckily I've experienced no irritation whatsoever when I've used the NATOrigin pencils.

Shades

I chose Grey, which is a very pale grey that looks blue-toned in some lights, and Brown. Brown is a mid-brown and while it's not as red-toned as some eye pencils, it's not too ashy either. There's enough warmth in there for this shade to really make your eye colour pop and it's very pigmented. Both shades are good everyday neutrals.

NATOrigin Original Pencil Eyeliners

Formula

At first these pencils feel a little harder than most, but warm the tip of the pencil up on your skin and suddenly application is a lot smoother. They're easy to apply and don't get blunt too quickly. I would recommend using a little brush instead of your fingers if you want to blend the colour out  I've found the brush doesn't tug at the delicate skin round your eyes.

Staying power

The colour doesn't smudge in the rain (and since this is a UK summer, I've had plenty of opportunities to test this out!) It does, however, fade over the course of the day  where it goes, I couldn't tell you, because I've never seen a trace of either shade on my face. Which is strange, because I normally wear the pencil along my lower lashline to add a little bit of definition; you'd think I'd end up with panda eyes. And while I'm very grateful that I've never walked around looking like I have the world's worst dark circles, I'm also mystified. (The colour lasts much longer on the eyelid and upper lashline.)

NATOrigin Original Pencil Eyeliners

Packaging

The pencils are a pretty teal colour, with each individual shade marked at the end. They're easy to spot in a make-up bag and the lid is secure.

Price

£7.95 per pencil. Each one contains 1.1g of product.

Pros: Ethical brand with gentle ingredients; hypoallergenic; neutral shades available; pigmented; colour doesn't smudge in the rain; pretty, secure packaging; less than £10 per pencil

Cons: Grey shade is quite pale; takes a bit of work to blend the colour out if you haven't warmed the pencil up on the back of your hand before application; colour can fade over the course of the day; contains beewax, so not suitable for vegans

The staying power of these pencils could be much better, but as someone who's suffered from sore, itchy eyes every summer for her entire adult, make-up wearing life, it's refreshing to find a cruelty-free pencil that doesn't irritate them, especially one that costs less than a tenner.

Do you get sensitive eyes in the summer? How do you change your make-up routine? Let me know in the comments!

Product was sent to me by LoveLula for consideration of review. As always, all words and opinion are my own.

Eye Pencils for Allergy Sufferers

I love wearing eyeliner, but I also get sore, itchy eyes during the summer months.

(And sometimes during spring, too. Hay fever is not kind.)

This always puts me right off wearing make-up. However, there are days when I quite fancy wearing something a little more dressy, make-up included, and it seems a shame to avoid it solely because of an allergy.

So when I spotted NATOrigin's Original Pencil Eyeliners* on LoveLula it seemed like the perfect time to try them out. The entire range is hypoallergenic and made especially for sensitive skin and eyes.

NATOrigin's products are:

  • Cruelty-free
  • Approved by the Vegetarian Society
  • Approved by Allergy UK
  • Certified natural and organic
  • Free from synthetic colours, fragrances, and preservatives
  • Housed in recyclable packaging


Exactly the kind of thing I look for! I decided to try the Original Pencil Eyeliner in Grey and Brown.

NATOrigin Original Pencil Eyeliners

Sensitive Eyes

As both a hay fever sufferer and a contact lens wearer, I know a fair bit about having sore eyes (damn you, grass pollen). Luckily I've experienced no irritation whatsoever when I've used the NATOrigin pencils.

Shades

I chose Grey, which is a very pale grey that looks blue-toned in some lights, and Brown. Brown is a mid-brown and while it's not as red-toned as some eye pencils, it's not too ashy either. There's enough warmth in there for this shade to really make your eye colour pop and it's very pigmented. Both shades are good everyday neutrals.

NATOrigin Original Pencil Eyeliners

Formula

At first these pencils feel a little harder than most, but warm the tip of the pencil up on your skin and suddenly application is a lot smoother. They're easy to apply and don't get blunt too quickly. I would recommend using a little brush instead of your fingers if you want to blend the colour out  I've found the brush doesn't tug at the delicate skin round your eyes.

Staying power

The colour doesn't smudge in the rain (and since this is a UK summer, I've had plenty of opportunities to test this out!) It does, however, fade over the course of the day  where it goes, I couldn't tell you, because I've never seen a trace of either shade on my face. Which is strange, because I normally wear the pencil along my lower lashline to add a little bit of definition; you'd think I'd end up with panda eyes. And while I'm very grateful that I've never walked around looking like I have the world's worst dark circles, I'm also mystified. (The colour lasts much longer on the eyelid and upper lashline.)

NATOrigin Original Pencil Eyeliners

Packaging

The pencils are a pretty teal colour, with each individual shade marked at the end. They're easy to spot in a make-up bag and the lid is secure.

Price

£7.95 per pencil. Each one contains 1.1g of product.

Pros: Ethical brand with gentle ingredients; hypoallergenic; neutral shades available; pigmented; colour doesn't smudge in the rain; pretty, secure packaging; less than £10 per pencil

Cons: Grey shade is quite pale; takes a bit of work to blend the colour out if you haven't warmed the pencil up on the back of your hand before application; colour can fade over the course of the day; contains beewax, so not suitable for vegans

The staying power of these pencils could be much better, but as someone who's suffered from sore, itchy eyes every summer for her entire adult, make-up wearing life, it's refreshing to find a cruelty-free pencil that doesn't irritate them, especially one that costs less than a tenner.

Do you get sensitive eyes in the summer? How do you change your make-up routine? Let me know in the comments!

Product was sent to me by LoveLula for consideration of review. As always, all words and opinion are my own.
Barefaced and Happy

If someone had told me two years ago that in the future I'd be perfectly happy leaving the house without a scrap of make-up on, I wouldn't have believed them.

At that time I refused to let the general public see me without the whole works  primer, foundation, two types of concealer, brow pencil, eyeshadow, liner, mascara, blush, and lipstick were the minimum. To me, that was toned down.

I had adult acne and I used cosmetics as a distraction. Spotty forehead? Time for a statement plum lip. Breakouts on my chin? Let me blend out a smoky eye. If I was really upset I'd add some false lashes.


(At this interval, I would like to point out that just because someone wears make-up, it doesn't automatically mean they're insecure. Yes, it can give you a boost when you're not feeling 100%, but it doesn't mean the person wearing it dislikes their face. Make-up is fun! That plum lipstick was a distraction, yes, but it was also pretty and it made me feel like I had my shit together.)

Over time my skin has cleared and I've become used to seeing my bare face staring back at me in the mirror. That previously pared-down face of make-up suddenly looks like a lot.


What this has reaffirmed for me is not that one approach is better than the other, and I'm not writing this to tell everyone that they should throw their make-up bags away  women and men should be able to adorn their faces as they damn well please.


Instead, it's reminded me that the beauty of make-up is the purpose it serves for you. It's versatile: you decide what works.


I wore my full-coverage foundation and my purple lipstick as if they were armour and they made me feel better about myself. Nowadays I'm more likely to find happiness in some brow pomade and a sheeny highlighter  and that's enough. I daresay there'll be a time when I start wearing more make-up again (I can never go for too long without a good eyeliner wing).


My made-up face isn't better than my bare face, and my bare face isn't better than my made-up face. They're just different. I'm sure there's someone out there who'd do the whole 'You look so tired' thing out of faux concern, but you know what? Fuck'em. I'm happy. 

Barefaced and Happy

Barefaced and Happy

If someone had told me two years ago that in the future I'd be perfectly happy leaving the house without a scrap of make-up on, I wouldn't have believed them.

At that time I refused to let the general public see me without the whole works  primer, foundation, two types of concealer, brow pencil, eyeshadow, liner, mascara, blush, and lipstick were the minimum. To me, that was toned down.

I had adult acne and I used cosmetics as a distraction. Spotty forehead? Time for a statement plum lip. Breakouts on my chin? Let me blend out a smoky eye. If I was really upset I'd add some false lashes.


(At this interval, I would like to point out that just because someone wears make-up, it doesn't automatically mean they're insecure. Yes, it can give you a boost when you're not feeling 100%, but it doesn't mean the person wearing it dislikes their face. Make-up is fun! That plum lipstick was a distraction, yes, but it was also pretty and it made me feel like I had my shit together.)

Over time my skin has cleared and I've become used to seeing my bare face staring back at me in the mirror. That previously pared-down face of make-up suddenly looks like a lot.


What this has reaffirmed for me is not that one approach is better than the other, and I'm not writing this to tell everyone that they should throw their make-up bags away  women and men should be able to adorn their faces as they damn well please.


Instead, it's reminded me that the beauty of make-up is the purpose it serves for you. It's versatile: you decide what works.


I wore my full-coverage foundation and my purple lipstick as if they were armour and they made me feel better about myself. Nowadays I'm more likely to find happiness in some brow pomade and a sheeny highlighter  and that's enough. I daresay there'll be a time when I start wearing more make-up again (I can never go for too long without a good eyeliner wing).


My made-up face isn't better than my bare face, and my bare face isn't better than my made-up face. They're just different. I'm sure there's someone out there who'd do the whole 'You look so tired' thing out of faux concern, but you know what? Fuck'em. I'm happy. 
I'm going to be blunt: cruelty-free sun protection is an absolute bugger to find.

I know the British weather can be unpredictable to say the least  I'm writing this the day after I both ate lunch outside in the beautiful sunshine and got woken up by a thunderstorm  but the sun always seems to break through eventually, even if it's in between rain showers. And apparently clouds only stop 20% of UV rays anyway, so it's incredibly important to apply your SPF on a regular basis.

But even with the best of intentions, SPF can clog up your pores and is often sticky, greasy, non-waterproof, non-sweatproof... and then of course you don't want to compromise your ethical stance (and why should you?), which rules out the majority of the high street market.

Enter Superdrug's Solait range.

Cruelty-free, Leaping Bunny-approved and with plenty of vegan products to choose from, Solait is ideal if you just want to nip off to the high street to grab your holiday essentials. The range is cheap, too, with most products costing under a fiver, and there are normally offers like buy one, get one half-price available.

But are the products any good?

Superdrug Solait Moisturising Sun Lotion

Moisturising Sun Lotion SPF30 (v), £2.99

I find this lotion has a thinner, lighter texture than your standard sun cream, which makes it a lot nicer to apply  it glides over the skin with ease and doesn't leave any residue. I wouldn't say it was particularly moisturising, so don't skip body butter if you need it, but for me this is a small price to pay for sun protection that doesn't make you feel like you've been basted.

Hair & Scalp Sun Spray SPF30 (v)

I had high hopes for this but it weighs my fine hair down and leaves my roots looking and feeling greasy. I tried it for a week and just couldn't cope with the scalp build-up  or the wet look, which I must confess I've never fully understood anyway. Perhaps those with thicker hair would have more success?

Superdrug Solait Enhanced Sun Lotion SPF50

Enhanced Sun Lotion SPF50 (v)

If you need a heavy duty SPF then this is the ultimate choice, since it protects from UVA, UVB, and infrared rays. It's much thicker than the Moisturising Sun Lotion and doesn't absorb quite so well, which makes it feel a little sticky, but if you don't want to take any chances then you can't go wrong. I've worn it many times and my skin hasn't even turned a teeny bit pink.

(I can't find a link on the website but I've seen Enhanced Sun Lotion in stores, so Solait don't seem to have discontinued it.)

Superdrug Solait Face Fluid

Anti-Ageing Face Fluid SPF30/SPF50 (v), £3.49 each [Only SPF50 is vegan.]

I bought this when I was with my mum, which led to exclamations of, 'What are you buying anti-ageing stuff for?! You're in your twenties!' but I don't want a sunburnt face, quite frankly.

Anti-Ageing Face Fluid has a thinner formula than the Enhanced Sun Lotion but is thicker than the Moisturising Sun Lotion, which is something to bear in mind if you like a lighter base. My skin gets oily quicker when I wear this by itself, although it's better when set with a light dusting of mineral foundation.

This fluid is good for holidays but I'm not so sure it works as an everyday SPF. I've worn it as both and my skin tends to get spottier if I use it too many days in a row, even if I double cleanse every night. I'm currently on the hunt for something else.

Final Thoughts

The one thing every product has in common is this: I've worn them on overcast days in the UK, the most unbearably humid days in Asia, and in the middle of the Arabian desert and not once have I been sunburnt.

Otherwise, this is a hit and miss bunch  I'd really recommend getting your hands on the Moisturising Sun Lotion though! A non-sticky, cruelty-free sun cream for £2.99? Sold.

Do you have any cruelty-free SPF recommendations? Let me know in the comments!

(v) = vegan

Cruelty-Free Sun Protection from Superdrug

I'm going to be blunt: cruelty-free sun protection is an absolute bugger to find.

I know the British weather can be unpredictable to say the least  I'm writing this the day after I both ate lunch outside in the beautiful sunshine and got woken up by a thunderstorm  but the sun always seems to break through eventually, even if it's in between rain showers. And apparently clouds only stop 20% of UV rays anyway, so it's incredibly important to apply your SPF on a regular basis.

But even with the best of intentions, SPF can clog up your pores and is often sticky, greasy, non-waterproof, non-sweatproof... and then of course you don't want to compromise your ethical stance (and why should you?), which rules out the majority of the high street market.

Enter Superdrug's Solait range.

Cruelty-free, Leaping Bunny-approved and with plenty of vegan products to choose from, Solait is ideal if you just want to nip off to the high street to grab your holiday essentials. The range is cheap, too, with most products costing under a fiver, and there are normally offers like buy one, get one half-price available.

But are the products any good?

Superdrug Solait Moisturising Sun Lotion

Moisturising Sun Lotion SPF30 (v), £2.99

I find this lotion has a thinner, lighter texture than your standard sun cream, which makes it a lot nicer to apply  it glides over the skin with ease and doesn't leave any residue. I wouldn't say it was particularly moisturising, so don't skip body butter if you need it, but for me this is a small price to pay for sun protection that doesn't make you feel like you've been basted.

Hair & Scalp Sun Spray SPF30 (v)

I had high hopes for this but it weighs my fine hair down and leaves my roots looking and feeling greasy. I tried it for a week and just couldn't cope with the scalp build-up  or the wet look, which I must confess I've never fully understood anyway. Perhaps those with thicker hair would have more success?

Superdrug Solait Enhanced Sun Lotion SPF50

Enhanced Sun Lotion SPF50 (v)

If you need a heavy duty SPF then this is the ultimate choice, since it protects from UVA, UVB, and infrared rays. It's much thicker than the Moisturising Sun Lotion and doesn't absorb quite so well, which makes it feel a little sticky, but if you don't want to take any chances then you can't go wrong. I've worn it many times and my skin hasn't even turned a teeny bit pink.

(I can't find a link on the website but I've seen Enhanced Sun Lotion in stores, so Solait don't seem to have discontinued it.)

Superdrug Solait Face Fluid

Anti-Ageing Face Fluid SPF30/SPF50 (v), £3.49 each [Only SPF50 is vegan.]

I bought this when I was with my mum, which led to exclamations of, 'What are you buying anti-ageing stuff for?! You're in your twenties!' but I don't want a sunburnt face, quite frankly.

Anti-Ageing Face Fluid has a thinner formula than the Enhanced Sun Lotion but is thicker than the Moisturising Sun Lotion, which is something to bear in mind if you like a lighter base. My skin gets oily quicker when I wear this by itself, although it's better when set with a light dusting of mineral foundation.

This fluid is good for holidays but I'm not so sure it works as an everyday SPF. I've worn it as both and my skin tends to get spottier if I use it too many days in a row, even if I double cleanse every night. I'm currently on the hunt for something else.

Final Thoughts

The one thing every product has in common is this: I've worn them on overcast days in the UK, the most unbearably humid days in Asia, and in the middle of the Arabian desert and not once have I been sunburnt.

Otherwise, this is a hit and miss bunch  I'd really recommend getting your hands on the Moisturising Sun Lotion though! A non-sticky, cruelty-free sun cream for £2.99? Sold.

Do you have any cruelty-free SPF recommendations? Let me know in the comments!

(v) = vegan
Last month I read a really interesting blog post by Laila from Tape Parade.

Let's Stop Eating Off The Vegan Menu is about supporting your local vegan and vegetarian restaurants by not only visiting them, but telling other people about them too.

'Vegan-friendly is great, but what I'm about is vegan-PROUD... I'm talking places that don't have a separate menu... Places that make you feel wanted and not just welcome. Restaurants with a menu full of choice.'

(Laila is an awesome writer so I encourage you to read the post in its entirety; I can't wait for her London restaurant reviews.)

As Laila points out, chain restaurants are all very well and good  especially in areas where choice is limited  but we need to support local independent businesses too.

With these words weighing on my mind, I decided to visit The Veg Box Cafe and then write about it afterwards. Best. Decision. Ever.


Food from The Veg Box


The Veg Box Cafe

Last month I read a really interesting blog post by Laila from Tape Parade.

Let's Stop Eating Off The Vegan Menu is about supporting your local vegan and vegetarian restaurants by not only visiting them, but telling other people about them too.

'Vegan-friendly is great, but what I'm about is vegan-PROUD... I'm talking places that don't have a separate menu... Places that make you feel wanted and not just welcome. Restaurants with a menu full of choice.'

(Laila is an awesome writer so I encourage you to read the post in its entirety; I can't wait for her London restaurant reviews.)

As Laila points out, chain restaurants are all very well and good  especially in areas where choice is limited  but we need to support local independent businesses too.

With these words weighing on my mind, I decided to visit The Veg Box Cafe and then write about it afterwards. Best. Decision. Ever.


Food from The Veg Box


Well, I say I've switched to mineral foundation just for summer  it may well be for life after the whole NARS debacle.

But warmer temperatures were my main motivation for swapping my usual base products for one simple pot of powder. Mineral foundation is a lot lighter than liquid formulas and I wanted something breathable to prevent breakouts, which sometimes pop up when I've been wearing a lot of SPF.

With all that in mind, I spotted PHB Ethical Beauty's Loose Mineral Foundation* (v) on LoveLula and couldn't resist trying it out. PHB's products are vegan, cruelty-free, gluten-free, paraben-free, and halal certified, plus they don't contain any nano particles, talc, fillers, mineral oils, or GM ingredients. If you're looking for natural beauty then you can't get much better than this!

PHB Ethical Beauty Loose Mineral Foundation in Cream

I Switched to Mineral Foundation for Summer

Well, I say I've switched to mineral foundation just for summer  it may well be for life after the whole NARS debacle.

But warmer temperatures were my main motivation for swapping my usual base products for one simple pot of powder. Mineral foundation is a lot lighter than liquid formulas and I wanted something breathable to prevent breakouts, which sometimes pop up when I've been wearing a lot of SPF.

With all that in mind, I spotted PHB Ethical Beauty's Loose Mineral Foundation* (v) on LoveLula and couldn't resist trying it out. PHB's products are vegan, cruelty-free, gluten-free, paraben-free, and halal certified, plus they don't contain any nano particles, talc, fillers, mineral oils, or GM ingredients. If you're looking for natural beauty then you can't get much better than this!

PHB Ethical Beauty Loose Mineral Foundation in Cream

When is the right time to stop telling everyone you're a recent graduate?

It's been an entire year since I graduated, so it's not really news, although most people I meet seem to think I'm either still at university or about to go. One woman I met recently asked me if I was at boarding school and she was shocked when I said no  the confusion a baby face can cause is really quite something.

Graduation programme

Graduation: One Year On

When is the right time to stop telling everyone you're a recent graduate?

It's been an entire year since I graduated, so it's not really news, although most people I meet seem to think I'm either still at university or about to go. One woman I met recently asked me if I was at boarding school and she was shocked when I said no  the confusion a baby face can cause is really quite something.

Graduation programme

Well, that was unexpected.

I wasn't planning to have a week away from blogging, you see, it just sort of happened, and I feel much better for it. I've been pretty run down  blocked nose, headache, sore throat, the works  and taking a step back from pretty much everything has worked wonders. (As have Tesco cold & flu tablets and gin & tonic ice lollies. Is there anything a good G&T can't fix?)

Anyway, I'm back today and focusing on some more eco-friendly beauty. Specifically, the konjac sponge.

Last year I tried a konjac sponge made for the face, with mixed results. I love the environmentally friendly approach towards making these sponges (they're all biodegradable) but the face sponge didn't work with the skincare products I normally use (balm cleansers and my acne cream).

But I don't use acne cream or balm cleansers on my body, so I decided to try out the Konjac Sponge Co's Pink Clay Body Sponge* (v) to see if that made a difference.

Konjac Sponge Co Pink Clay Body Sponge

Eco-Friendly Beauty: The Konjac Sponge Co's Pink Clay Body Sponge

Well, that was unexpected.

I wasn't planning to have a week away from blogging, you see, it just sort of happened, and I feel much better for it. I've been pretty run down  blocked nose, headache, sore throat, the works  and taking a step back from pretty much everything has worked wonders. (As have Tesco cold & flu tablets and gin & tonic ice lollies. Is there anything a good G&T can't fix?)

Anyway, I'm back today and focusing on some more eco-friendly beauty. Specifically, the konjac sponge.

Last year I tried a konjac sponge made for the face, with mixed results. I love the environmentally friendly approach towards making these sponges (they're all biodegradable) but the face sponge didn't work with the skincare products I normally use (balm cleansers and my acne cream).

But I don't use acne cream or balm cleansers on my body, so I decided to try out the Konjac Sponge Co's Pink Clay Body Sponge* (v) to see if that made a difference.

Konjac Sponge Co Pink Clay Body Sponge

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Beth, 23, South East England. I'm a writer with a love of books, lipstick, and the Oxford comma. I love beauty and I also love animals, so I only buy, use, and feature products from cruelty-free brands. (Seriously though, I am the person who stops to fuss over every dog she sees.) You can also expect posts about vegan/vegetarian food, and plenty of musings about life as a 20-something. Want to get in touch? Email me at beth.toasty@gmail.com

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